Monday, December 07, 2015

Scheme for promotion of Adventure Sports and similar activities

Scheme for promotion of Adventure Sports and similar activities amongst CG Employees: DoPT circular



No.125/1/2015-16/CCSCSB
Government of India
Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances & Pensions
Department of Personnel & Training

Lok Nayak Bhawan, New Delhi
Dated 04th December, 2015

OFFICE MEMORANDUM

Sub: Scheme for promotion of Adventure Sports and similar activities amongst Central Government Employees.

The undersigned is directed to enclose herewith a copy of the Scheme for promotion of Adventure Sports and similar activities amongst Central Government Employees with the request that the contents of the Scheme may please be disseminated amongst the employees who are eligible to avail the benefits of the Scheme.

2. The details of the programmes etc. will be circulated/placed on the website of the Department of Personnel & Training separately.


(Abhay Jain)
Under Secretary to the Govt. of India.


No.1251112015-16-CCSCSB
Department of Personnel & Training
New Delhi, the 4th December, 2015.

SCHEME FOR PROMOTION OF ADVENTURE SPORTS & SIMILAR ACTIVITIES AMONGST CENTRAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

1. Background : The Department of Personnel and Training recognizes that welfare of employees is one of the prime tasks of personnel management and sports activities play an important role in improving their efficiency and morale. Participation by Central Government’Employees in adventure sports and similar activities will give them a platform where they would learn lessons from nature and use the knowledge acquired for welfare of the society.

2. Vision : To foster Spirit of risk-taking, cooperative team work, capacity of readiness, vital response to challenging situations, endurance and environmental awareness.

3. Mission : The Mission 'of the Scheme for promotion of adventure sports and similar activities is to encourage Central Government Employees working in the Ministries/Department of the Government of India to take part in these activities by giving financial assistance and other incentives. The Central Civil Services Cultural & Sports Board, a Society registered under the Society Registration Act, 1860, which is under the aegis and control of the Department of Personnel & Training will be the nodal agency for the Scheme.

4. Objectives :
1. The Scheme would tackle the alarming situation of stress and impact of sedentary life on Government servants as highlighted in several studies conducted so far;
2. It would provide a creative outlet to Central Government Employees;
3. It would create and foster spirit of risk - taking, cooperative team work, capacity of readiness and vital response to challenging situations and of endurance;
4. Central Government Employees would be prepared for better Disaster Management; and
5. Environment-alt awareness would be inculcated amongst the Central Government Employees.
5. Scope of the Scheme : The scope of the Scheme is limited to Central Government Employees working in the Ministries/Departments of Government of India. It will also be limited to the programme run by Institutes/Organizations approved by the Department of Personnel Training.

6. Activities to be sponsored and Institutes : The Department of Personnel & Training Will sponsor programmes of 5-7 days duration to be organized by the Institutes/Organizations listed at Annex-I The programme will have components of environmental awareness, disaster management, team spirit, capacity building, and Swachchh Bharat Campaign. The activities under the programme will be Trekking, Mountaineering, Rock-Climbing, Cycling in a difficult terrain, Skiing, Surfing, Boat Sailing, Snorkeling, Rafting, Para Sailing Ballooning, Para Gliding, Jungle Safari/Trekking, Desert Safari/Trekking, Beach Trekking and Environmental Awareness Camps etc. A Calendar of the programmes admissible under the Scheme will be circulated by the Department of Personnel & Training from time to time.

7. Financial Assistance and other incentives :

7.1 The Department of Personnel & Training will provide financial assistance to the eligible Central Government Employees for the programme of approved activities and conducted by the Institutes
listed in Annex I

7.2 Financial assistance will be in the form of reimbursement of Travel Expenses, programme fee and Hiring Charges of the equipments as per the terms and conditions specified in paragraph 7.3 and with a maximum ceiling of Rs..20,0-00/- (Rs. Twenty thousand only) per person per camp. The assistance will be limited to one activity in a block period of two year. Financial Assistance of 100% of
programme fee would be provided in a calendar year to two officials of each Ministries/Departments who have been awarded by the Ministry/Department for excellence in service and nominated for the
programme.

7.3 The following Heads are admissible for financial assistance under the Scheme:

i) To and fro travel expenses as per the entitlements under Leave Travel Concessions Rules with a maximum ceiling of Rs. 4,000/-;

ii) Re-imbursement of Programme fee:

· (a) 90% for Group ‘ C’ Central Government Employee;
· (b) 80% for Group ‘ B’ Central Government Employee; and
· (c) 75% for Group ‘ A’ Central Government Employee.

iii) Actual hiring charges if the necessary equipment are hired from any Government agency with adequate proof subject to maximum of Rs. 2000/-.

7.4 Special Casual Leave will be granted to eligible. participants in accordance with Department of Personnel & Training Office Memorandum No. 6/1/1985-Estt.(Pay-I) dated 16th July, 1985 and
No. 6/1/85-Estt(Pay-I) dated 7th November, 1988.

8. Procedure for availing benefits of the Scheme :

8.1 The Central Government Employee will register himself with the Institute/Organization for the approved programme and make payment for it. He/she will simultaneously also submit his/her
application to Central Civil Services Cultural & Sports Board duly forwarded by the Welfare Officer of their respective Ministry/Department.


8.2 The Ministry/Department will forward nominations of officials who have been awarded by the Ministry/Department for excellence in service and eligible for Financial Assistance of 100% of programme fee.


8.3 The Welfare Officer of the Ministry/Department in each case will certify that the recommended official is a Central Government employee working in the main Ministry/Department and medically fit for the adventure activities opted by him.


8.4 The financial assistance will be given on successful completion of the programme and submission of participation certificate to the Central Civil Services Cultural and Sports Board.


9. Flexibility to expand the scope : The Department of Personnel& Training will reserve the rights to modify the scheme, addition or deletion of activities, Institutes/Organization, change in pattern of
financial assistance and other conditions of the Scheme without any prior notice.

ANNEX - I

LIST OF APPROVED INSTITUTES/ORGANISATIONS FOR SCHEME FOR PROMOTION OF ADVENTURE SPORTS AND SIMILAR ACTIVITIES AMONGST GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

1. Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, Uttarkashi, Uttarakhand. (Recognized by Ministry of Defence and Government of Uttarakhand)

2. Atal Bihari Vajpayee Institute of Mountaineering and Allied Sports, Manaii, Himachal Pradesh. (Government of Himachal Pradesh)

3. Indian Institute of Skiing & Mountaineering, Department of Tourism, Gulmarg, Jammu & Kashmir. (Ministry of Tourism)

4. National Institute of Water Sports, Vasco da Gama, Goa. (Ministry of Tourism)

5. Swami ‘ Vivekanand Institute of Mountaineering, Mount Abu, Rajasthan. (Government of Gujarat)

6'. Garhwal Mandal Vikas Nigam Ltd, Dehradun, Uttarakhand. (Government of Uttarakhand)

Source : www.persmin.nic.in

The report of the Seventh Pay Commission has lost a massive reform opportunity

Pay commissions are appointed to reform government as a delivery system, not just to hike salary scales of government employees.

Pay commissions have over time become trivialized into vehicles for raising the salary scales of serving and retired government employees, justified by citing the need to raise the calibre of aspirants to government service. Pay commission reports also do some minor tweaking of service conditions such as leave and medical entitlements, but neither these nor the salary hikes will by themselves transform the civil services into a functioning delivery system. It will happen only if the structure of government is reformed so that it is shaped to deliver.

The report of the Seventh Pay Commission has yet again lost a massive opportunity for effecting such reform. Surprisingly, for a salary hike that is justified on the grounds that it will raise the calibre of future entrants, no surveys of aspirants are ever performed to get what they are looking for. Are they just looking at salaries?

The terms of reference given to the Seventh Pay Commission were well drawn and explicitly directed them to “...foster excellence in the public governance system to respond to the complex challenges of modern administration and the rapid political, social, economic and technological changes, with due regard to expectations of stakeholders...” Although so empowered, the commission refrains at several points in the report from encroaching on administrative issues. They would have been applauded for doing so by a nation fed up with the bureaucratic gridlock.


The first deep reform needed was to mark a date—say 15 years into the future— beyond which posts at central ministries, including at the highest level, would be filled exclusively from services executing the function required in each. There is a Central Engineering Service (Roads), yet you would never find them occupying top posts in the ministry of road transport at secretary or additional secretary level, or in the National Highways Authority of India. Is it any wonder that an IIT graduate prefers to sit for the civil services exam for entrance into the Indian Administrative Service (IAS) rather than the Indian Engineering Services (IES) exam? The prospect of rising to secretary rank has to be advertised at the time of IES entrance for it to have an impact on the aspirant pool. Structural reforms need to be made today with that kind of forward delivery date.

The service parity issue has indeed been addressed in the report, but in terms of promotion intervals and pay disparities. The more serious consequence of the hierarchy between services has to do with disruption to functioning when a ministry with a particular deliverable is manned at the top by officials with no specialist knowledge or experience in delivering that service at the ground level.

What is technical? The report falls into the common trap of classifying the Indian Audit and Accounts Service (IA&AS) and all other accounts services as non-technical (para 7.4.5). But accounting and auditing are as technical as engineering, in the sense of requiring a specialized course of study. And how does the Indian Railway Store Service get into the technical list? These are all inherited categorizations which need to be done away with. The fundamental distinction is specialist versus general. Specialist services alone should fill posts delivering that specialized service. Simple.

The second failing of the system which the commission accepts as given is that there will be elite Group A services (including the IES inductees), accounting for as little as 2.8% of the total number of central employees (which itself, at 3.3 million, is small by international standards relative to the size of the population). The major task of delivering governance rests with Groups B and C, who are rewarded by being shut out from decision-making posts. This segmentation even within each deliverable has shattered internal cohesion within government.

The thin sliver entitled to key posts together with seniority issues makes for the continued shuffling of senior bureaucrats between ministries. Add to this the absurdity of certain ministries carrying more prestige than others, and you have the elite services themselves more disgruntled than pleased by the rigidities in the present structure. With constant movement at the top, the stable and stagnant base which actually executes the function within each ministry develops resentments and disrespect translating into dysfunction, enough to thwart even the most well-meaning and able IAS officers appointed to head them.

Therefore, the second deep reform that the pay commission needed to do was to define verticals for each of the major functions listed in part 7, and look at induction and progression through the vertical as a whole. IES service cadres constitute 15% of all engineers in government service. The vast majority of engineers are appointed not to a service, but to a subordinate post, with quotas governing the proportions of vacancies that can be filled through mobility from lower to higher posts. The pay commission tweaks these proportions, but quotas with floors for compulsory filling from lower levels are as damaging as ceilings to mobility. What is needed is a deeper reform of engineering into a single common service, with functional specializations, cadres within each graded A to E, and entrance to every grade and every level within every grade open to in-service applicants. A diploma holder who enters the service in Grade E should in principle be able to rise through talent and hard work all the way to Grade A.

The third reform needed is non-uniform retirement ages within each functional service. This nettle has been grasped in the armed forces, for example, where it is understood that combat troops have to retire earlier than those in desk jobs. Equivalently, there are jobs like that of linesman in electricity companies, where the rules prescribe an age ceiling for the work of line repair at 45, but where the individuals remain on the payroll up to the uniform retirement age of 60. In an upwardly mobile vertical, these employees can graduate up to higher levels, but for those who do not, the retirement age has to be equated to the performance limit for the function.


IES inductees at least take a separate engineering entrance examination. But a whole host of other services share a common entrance examination with the IAS. We then have the self-reinforcing system whereby, in a structure where higher posts are routinely filled by the IAS, the top ranking candidates in the common examination naturally choose the IAS, which then perpetuates the assignment of top posts to the IAS on the grounds that they got a higher rank in the common exam. The system constantly loops back into itself.

An example is the IA&AS, a Group A service. The post of Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) as a constitutional position cannot be assigned to any service, so the highest post the IA&AS can aspire to is that of deputy CAG. In practice, the post of CAG is filled by retired IAS officers. Given that, clearly even applicants with excellent prior education in commerce and accounting would prefer the IAS, because among other advantages they get included in the pool from which the national auditor will eventually be drawn. Senior posts in ministries of financial adviser are also typically not filled from any of the accounts services.

The entire accounting and auditing vertical needs to merged, both horizontally across the several services into which it is splintered at the elite level (defence accounts, railway accounts and other such), and also merged vertically with posts into which accountants are inducted on the strength of prior degrees without an entrance test. With full merger, and unobstructed access to senior posts requiring accounting skills, we would begin to see the strength and confidence needed for ensuring that government expenditure is effective, without the obstructionism born of resentment.

The final paradox is that as salaries are regularly winched up for employees on the permanent payroll of government, the salary bill is sought to be held down in practice by either not filling vacancies, or filling them with temporary staff. The data on vacancies show one in five positions vacant as on 1 January 2014 on average across all departments, ranging up to nearly one in two positions in some ministries (the finance ministry among them). This is the single most important indicator of dysfunctionality of government in India, since elsewhere in the world, vacancies either address a functional need (in which case they are immediately filled), or not (in which case the post is axed). The report says nothing about either that or related issues such as the protection (not) accorded to contractual workers in outsourced services for the running of office canteens, security services, and maintenance of buildings and grounds, other than a feeble injunction (para 3.80) against exploitation of such employees.

Every commission is a reform opportunity. That is why the failure of the Seventh Pay Commission to look more deeply at the structure of government is something of such profound consequence. A pulpit like that happens only once in 10 years.

Temporary suspension of booking of articles in BPCs and BNPL centres

Temporary suspension of booking of articles in BPCs and BNPL centres for Chennai, Kanchipuram, Tiruvannamalai, Krishnagiri, Dharampuri, Viluppuram, Cuddalore and Pudduchery areas of Tamil Nadu Circle

Temporary suspension of booking of articles in BPCs and BNPL centres for Chennai, Kanchipuram, Tiruvannamalai, Krishnagiri, Dharampuri, Viluppuram, Cuddalore and Pudduchery areas of Tamil Nadu Circle


Revised Pension Table for Pre-2016 Pensioners

PB & GP
PB-1 & GP 1800
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
3665
LEVEL OF VII CPC
1
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
Up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
9419
11303
12245
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
9000
10800
11700
1
9250
11100
12025
2
9550
11460
12415
3
9850
11820
12805
4
10150
12180
13195
5
10450
12540
13585
6
10750
12900
13975
7
11050
13260
14365
8
11400
13680
14820
9
11750
14100
15275
10
12100
14520
15730
11
12450
14940
16185
12
12800
15360
16640
13
13200
15840
17160
14
13600
16320
17680
15
14000
16800
18200
PB & GP
PB-1 & GP 1900
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
3890
LEVEL OF VII CPC
2
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
Up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
9997
11997
12996
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
9950
11940
12935
1
10250
12300
13325
2
10550
12660
13715
3
10850
13020
14105
4
11200
13440
14560
5
11550
13860
15015
6
11900
14280
15470
7
12250
14700
15925
8
12600
15120
16380
9
13000
15600
16900
10
13400
16080
17420
11
13800
16560
17940
12
14200
17040
18460
13
14650
17580
19045
14
15100
18120
19630
15
15550
18660
20215
PB & GP
PB-1 & GP 2400
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
4920
LEVEL OF VII CPC
4
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
12644
15173
16438
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
12750
15300
16575
1
13150
15780
17095
2
13550
16260
17615
3
13950
16740
18135
4
14350
17220
18655
5
14750
17700
19175
6
15250
18300
19825
7
15700
18840
20410
8
16150
19380
20995
9
16650
19980
21645
10
17150
20580
22295
11
17650
21180
22945
12
18200
21840
23660
13
18750
22500
24375
14
19300
23160
25090
15
19900
23880
25870
PB & GP
PB-1 & GP-2800
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
5585
LEVEL OF VII CPC
5
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
14353
17224
18659
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
14600
17520
18980
1
15050
18060
19565
2
15500
18600
20150
3
15950
19140
20735
4
16450
19740
21385
5
16950
20340
22035
6
17450
20940
22685
7
17950
21540
23335
8
18500
22200
24050
9
19050
22860
24765
10
19600
23520
25480
11
20200
24240
26260
12
20800
24960
27040
13
21400
25680
27820
14
22050
26460
28665
15
22700
27240
29510
PB & GP
PB-2 & GP-4200
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
6750
LEVEL OF VII CPC
6
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
17348
20817
22552
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
17700
21240
23010
1
18250
21900
23725
2
18800
22560
24440
3
19350
23220
25155
4
19950
23940
25935
5
20550
24660
26715
6
21150
25380
27495
7
21800
26160
28340
8
22450
26940
29185
9
23100
27720
30030
10
23800
28560
30940
11
24500
29400
31850
12
25250
30300
32825
13
26000
31200
33800
14
26800
32160
34840
15
27600
33120
35880
PB & GP
PB-2 & GP-4600
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
9230
LEVEL OF VII CPC
7
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
23721
27062
30837
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
22450
26940
29185
1
23100
27720
30030
2
23800
28560
30940
3
24500
29400
31850
4
25250
30300
32825
5
26000
31200
33800
6
26800
32160
34840
7
27600
33120
35880
8
28450
34140
36985
9
29300
35160
38090
10
30200
36240
39260
11
31100
37320
40430
12
32050
38460
41665
13
33000
39600
42900
14
34000
40800
44200
15
35000
42000
45500
PB & GP
PB-2 & GP-4800
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
9375
LEVEL OF VII CPC
8
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
24094
27005
31322
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
23800
28560
30940
1
24500
29400
31850
2
25250
30300
32825
3
26000
31200
33800
4
26800
32160
34840
5
27600
33120
35880
6
28450
34140
36985
7
29300
35160
38090
8
30200
36240
39260
9
31100
37320
40430
10
32050
38460
41665
11
33000
39600
42900
12
34000
40800
44200
13
35000
42000
45500
14
36050
43260
46865
15
37150
44580
48295
PB & GP
PB-2 & GP-5400
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
10140
LEVEL OF VII CPC
9
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
26060
31272
33878
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
26550
31860
34515
1
27350
32820
35555
2
28150
33780
36595
3
29000
34800
37700
4
29850
35820
38805
5
30750
36900
39975
6
31650
37980
41145
7
32600
39120
42380
8
33600
40320
43680
9
34600
41520
44980
10
35650
42780
46345
11
36700
44040
47710
12
37800
45360
49140
13
38950
46740
50635
14
40100
48120
52130
15
41300
49560
53690
PB & GP
PB-3 & GP-5400
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
11070
LEVEL OF VII CPC
10
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
26985
32382
35081
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
28050
33660
36465
1
28900
34680
37570
2
29750
35700
38675
3
30650
36780
39845
4
31550
37860
41015
5
32500
39000
42250
6
33500
40200
43550
7
34500
41400
44850
8
35550
42660
46215
9
36600
43920
47580
10
37700
45240
49010
11
38850
46620
50505
12
40000
48000
52000
13
41200
49440
53560
14
42450
50940
55185
15
43700
52440
56810
PB & GP
PB-3 & GP-6600
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
12600
LEVEL OF VII CPC
11
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
32382
38858
42097
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
33850
40620
44005
1
34850
41820
45305
2
35900
43080
46670
3
37000
44400
48100
4
38100
45720
49530
5
39250
47100
51025
6
40450
48540
52585
7
41650
49980
54145
8
42900
51480
55770
9
44200
53040
57460
10
45550
54660
59215
11
46900
56280
60970
12
48300
57960
62790
13
49750
59700
64675
14
51250
61500
66625
15
52800
63360
68640
PB & GP
PB-3 & GP-7600
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
14960
LEVEL OF VII CPC
12
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
38450
46140
49980
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
39400
47280
51220
1
40600
48720
52780
2
41800
50160
54340
3
43050
51660
55965
4
44350
53220
57655
5
45700
54840
59410
6
47050
56460
61165
7
48450
58140
62985
8
49900
59880
64870
9
51400
61680
66820
10
52950
63540
68835
11
54550
65460
70915
12
56200
67440
73060
13
57900
69480
75270
14
59650
71580
77545
15
61450
73740
79885
PB & GP
PB-4 & GP-8700
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
23050
LEVEL OF VII CPC
13
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
59239
71086
77010
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
59250
71100
77025
1
61050
73260
79365
2
62900
75480
81770
3
64800
77760
84240
4
66750
80100
86775
5
68750
82500
89375
6
70800
84960
92040
7
72900
87480
94770
8
75100
90120
97630
9
77350
92820
100555
10
79650
95580
103545
11
82050
98460
106665
12
84500
101400
109850
13
87050
104460
113165
14
89650
107580
116545
15
92350
110820
120055
PB & GP
PB-4 & GP-8900
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
24295
LEVEL OF VII CPC
13A
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
62438
74926
81170
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
65550
78660
85215
1
67500
81000
87750
2
69550
83460
90415
3
71650
85980
93145
4
73800
88560
95940
5
76000
91200
98800
6
78300
93960
101790
7
80650
96780
104845
8
83050
99660
107965
9
85550
102660
111215
10
88100
105720
114530
11
90750
108900
117975
12
93450
112140
121485
13
96250
115500
125125
14
99150
118980
128895
15
102100
122520
132730
PB & GP
PB-4 & GP-10000
MIN PENSION IN 6th CPC
27350
LEVEL OF VII CPC
14
New Pension in 7th CPC
AGE
up to 80
80-85
85-90
OPTION 1 REV MIN PENS with 2.57 Multiple
70290
84347
91376
OPTION 2 - REVISED PENSION WITH INCREMENTS @ 3% PA FOR NUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED WHILE IN SERVICENUMBER OF INCREMENTS EARNED IN THAT LEVEL WHILE IN SERVICE0
72100
86520
93730
1
74250
89100
96525
2
76500
91800
99450
3
78800
94560
102440
4
81150
97380
105495
5
83600
100320
108680
6
86100
103320
111930
7
88700
106440
115310
8
91350
109620
118755
9
94100
112920
122330
10
96900
116280
125970
11
99800
119760
129740
12
102800
123360
133640
13
105900
127080
137670
14
109100
130920
141830
15
NOTE: Based on the recommendations of 7th CPC vide Para 10.1.67 of its Report, an ALL-IN ONE table for pension has been prepared from where the likely pension can be determined easily.
  • The table covers all the 5th CPC scales from S 4 to S 29 (except S 6) grouped in 4 PBs after 6th CPC. These have been assigned Levels 1 to 14 in the matrix table by 7th CPC.
  • The table also gives pension for pensioners falling in 3 age groups i.e. upto 80 years and with additional pension @ 20% and 30% after the age of 80 and 85 respectively.
  • Since the pension as per option 2 may take time, the pension as per option 1 (with a factor of 2.57) may be paid in the first instance as an interim measure.
  • Pension as per option-1 is to be calculated on the basis of pension as fixed after 6th CPC. This being different for pensioners retiring from the same scale, the figures in the table under option -1 are according to the minimum revised basic pension as per DOP OM dated 30-7-2015. The Pension is to be finally fixed at the higher of the two Options.
  • In some levels like levels 6, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, there is no common min revised pension as per 6th CPC (differing with each scale though GP is same). The table can accommodate only one figure. Therefore, in such cases lowest of the figure has been taken as representative of the respective level.
Compiled by N.P . MOHAN C.E (Retd.) Railways & President RSCWS

7th CPC Increment : Recommendations on Annual and Promotional Increment

7th CPC Increment : Recommendations on Annual and Promotional Increment 
7th CPC Increment : The 7th Pay Commission has recommended on the rate of annual increment is being retained at 3 percent. 

Illustrative Examples in Respect of annual increment… 


Withholding Annual Increments of Non-performers after 20 Years : There is a widespread perception that increments as well as upward movement in the hierarchy happen as a matter of course. The perception is that grant of MACP, although subject to the employee attaining the laid down threshold of performance, is taken for granted. This Commission believes that employees who do not meet the laid down performance criterion should not be allowed to earn future annual increments. The Commission is therefore proposing withholding of annual increments in the case of those employees who are not able to meet the benchmark either for MACP or a regular promotion within the first 20 years of their service. 

This will act as a deterrent for complacent and inefficient employees. However, since this is not a penalty, the norms for penal action in disciplinary cases involving withholding increments will not be applicable in such cases. This will be treated as an “efficiency bar”. Additionally, for such employees there could be an option to leave service on similar terms and conditions as prescribed for voluntary retirement. 

Grant of First Annual Increment in Recruits Pay : The main demand of the Services in this connection is that the existing stipulation that next increment will be granted from the date of attestation or mustering be done away with. They have pointed out that trades whose skill requirements are low and whose entry level qualifications are lower invariably get attested or mustered earlier and thus are entitled to the next annual increment earlier than trades whose training period is longer. 

Analysis and Recommendations : The Commission is of the view that grant of next increment in the case of recruits should not place those with higher entry level qualifications at a disadvantage. The Commission, accordingly recommends that the date of enrolment should be reckoned for the purposes of first increment for all recruits who are finally successfully attested/mustered. 
Authority: www.7cpc.india.gov.in

Cheque Inward Clearing in DOP Finacle [Video Tutor]

Supervisor to open the Zone and enable the Operator to lodge (enter) the inward cheques received for clearing.

SUPERVISOR

  1. Invoke menu HMICZ – for Zone Open 
  2. Select the appropriate zone (MICR OR CTS). As of now only MICR zone should be opened. CTS Zone should not be selected even the office is linked to a CTS Zone.
  3. Zone Date – By default System date
  4. Total Advice - If the Total amount of inward clearance is known, Supervisor can enter the total amount of inward clearance amount. This can be modified even at a later stage .
  5. Total No. of instruments in Advice – Total number of cheques corresponding to the Total advice to be entered. This also can be modified at a later stage. Click on Submit.

Video Tutor about Inward Clearing

Finacle Inward clearing Cheque Entry Part

Finacle Inward clearing Cheque Post Zone

Prepare Agent LOT through Agent Portal [Video Tutor]

Video Tutorial for Agent LOT Preparation in Agent Portal

  1. Login into DOP Agent web Portal 
  2. Agen Enquire and Upload button Prepare list of accounts to be deposited in Finacle.
  3. Enter number of installment of an individual account then click on save.
  4. Click Pay All installment to prepare the list with reference number.

Generate Report

  • Click on Reports which is available in left side window 
  • Enter reference number then click on search button to list out the details which you has  already prepared.
  • Select PDF in download as dropdown box then click OK to download PDF document.
  • Now your prepared LOT is available in PDF format.

7th Pay Commission recommendations on Retirement Age

7th Pay Commission recommendations on Retirement Age of CRPF, BSF, ITBP and SSB. Enhancement of Age of Retirement from Existing 57 years to 60 Years of Age
This demand has been made by CRPF, BSF, ITBP and SSB. As per the existing position the age of retirement in Assam Rifles and CISF is 60 while it is 57 in rest of the CAPFs up to the rank of Commandants. DoPT has stated that although the issue was dealt with by the V and the VI CPCs, neither of the Commissions recommended any changes in the age of superannuation. MHA has also declined to enhance the age of superannuation on the ground that the age of retirement has been fixed depending on operational need of that particular Organisation.

Having considered the entire position and the views of MHA and DoPT on this issue, the Chairman, Seventh CPC feels that the grounds stated for justifying differential age of superannuation are not very convincing. Further, members of the CAPFs squarely form a part of the civilian work force. Hence, the Chairman recommends a uniform age of superannuation of 60 years to all CAPFs. Dr. Rathin Roy, Member, Seventh CPC is in
agreement with this recommendation.

However, Shri Vivek Rae, Member, Seventh CPC has not agreed with this recommendation for the following reasons:-

a. Ministry of Home Affairs is of the considered view that the age of superannuation cannot be enhanced from existing 57 years to 60 years for all ranks of CRPF, BSF, SSB and ITBP. Force personnel up to the rank of Commandant have operational/combat roles in the field, which require higher physical fitness and efficiency. The higher ranks of DIG and above in these four CAPFs are more supervisory and administrative in nature, which do not require physical fitness of the level required in field units. Therefore, in the ranks of DIG and above in the four CAPFs, the age of retirement is 60 years, while for ranks till the level of Commandant, the retirement age is 57 years.

b. Stipulating a lower age of superannuation up to the rank of Commandant in these four CAPFs is a well thought and conscious decision of the government based on ground realities and as per the administrative and operational requirement of the forces. Even in the Army, there are different ages for retirement, which increase in accordance with rank.

c. MHA has further observed that it is not correct to say that in Assam Rifles the age of retirement up to the rank of Commandant is 60 years. Assam Rifles is officered by the Army, and the retirement age at the level of Colonel is not 60 years but 57 years.

d. CAPFs like ITBP, BSF are posted on border/high altitude/difficult terrain duties and CRPF is generally deployed for internal security duties and CI operations. Hence their functional profile is more akin to Army, justifying younger age of the Force. Thus, 57 years in other CAPFs and 60 years in CISF is commensurate with the different roles assigned to them.

HO vs SO SB Discrepancies Finder

A very useful tool for HO - SO Balance agreement
Functions :- 
  1. Provides list accounts with Transaction date, Transaction Type, Amount which are not matching with SO / HO. 
  2. Reports for Interest Entries, Except Interest Entries can be taken 
  3. Provides list accounts having balancing error with first occurance date of total mistake. (Yes., even electronic ledger in computer may have total mistake) 

MS SQL 2005 Express (53.5 MB)


MS SQL Server Management Studio Express (38.5 MB)

HO vs SO SB Discrepancies Finder(Offline installer) 


7th CPC MACP Scheme

NC JCM Staff Side demanding five promotions in the service career
Career progression: Grant five promotions in the service career. 
For the efficient functioning of an institution, the primary pre-requisite is to have a contended workforce. It is not only the emoluments, perks and privileges that motivate an employee to give his best. They are no doubt important. But what is more important is to provide them a systematic career progression.

The present system of career progression available in the All India Services and the organised group A Civil services attracts large number of young, talented and educated persons to compete in the All India Civil Service Examination. No different was the career progression scheme available in the subordinate services in the past.


Persons who were recruited to subordinate services were able to climb to Managerial positions over a period of time. The situation underwent vast changes in the last two decades. In most of the Departments, stagnation has come to stay. It takes decades to be promoted to the next higher grade in the hierarchy. It was the recognition of the lack of promotional avenue in the subordinate services that made the 5th CPC to recommend a time bound two career progression scheme. The three time bound scheme of MACP instead of improving the situation has been found less beneficial and has therefore not gone to address the inherent problem of de-motivation that has crept in due to the high level of stagnation.

In most of the Departments, the exercise of cadre review which was considered important was not carried out. Any attempt in this regard was restricted to Group A services. The discontent amongst the employees in the matter is of high magnitude today. The VII CPC therefore, should recommend that the cadre reviews are undertaken wherever not done sofar to ensure five hierarchical promotions to all employees in their career on the pattern obtaining for Group A Officers.